(1) Tests are very important. They can indicate so many different things when it comes to testing at which level an individual scores at and their proper placement. Primary schools use testing to dete

(1)

Tests are very important. They can indicate so many different things when it comes to testing at which level an individual scores at and their proper placement. Primary schools use testing to determine if a child should be placed in gifted and talented programs or if they could be moved up a grade. When it comes to universities, they basically test if you are smart enough to allowed to attend their school. Psychological tests are in place at certain jobs, such as law enforcement type of jobs, to test if you are able to mentally handle the job at hand. I have worked in the law enforcement field for several years and for different positions, I have had to take psychological testing to see of I mentally have what it takes to do the job and will not cave under the pressure. I believe this kind of testing is highly needed when it comes to certain jobs and schooling to determine what level of learning they are at or if they are mentally fit to perform the job they are applying for.

(2)

When it comes to standardized tests, I understand that big institutions such as universities rely on them to get an idea of the perspective students’ intelligence. However, as stated in the discussion prompt, there is not one level of intelligence. It should be viewed as a spectrum. As stated in our chapter, I appreciated Binet’s view regarding intelligence testing. Rather than focusing on reading and mathematics, he believed it was important to examine one’s cognitive functions. Such as, attentiveness, memory, and imagination. Opposed to Galton and Cattell’s approach that centered around, the amount of pressure on the forehead needed to cause pain, reacting to sound, timed while naming colors, or rate of movement. Further, just how Cattell found that the tests he conducted were not accurate predictors of one’s college achievement or intelligence. The same can be said for the standardized testing done to predict success. The 3 to 12 different areas of intelligence cannot be found and/or determined by the accustomed standardized testing. Tests must be transformed. Instead of seeking ways to change testing for generations to come, this has become monopolized, as Chapter 8 mentions, test prep schools and tutoring opportunities for the SAT have become a billion-dollar industry.

IN 4-5 LINES, RESPOND TO THIS TWO DISCUSSION BOARD